Direct, immediate help to lift displaced individuals and families into a position where they can help each other, their families and their communities, across the Upper Valley. The fund currently supports Afghan evacuees in Hanover, NH and White River Junction, VT.

Can you help?

There are several ways to contribute

1. Pay with credit, debit, or PayPal

by clicking the “Donate” button. Note that CommunityCare of Lyme administers the Welcome Fund. 

2. Mail a check to:

Welcome Fund
P.O. Box 127
Lyme, NH 03768

3. For planned gifts, stock transfers, or other preferred ways to share your support:

Please email UVNSTWelcome@gmail.com.

Your donation will have an immediate impact, helping a new neighbor to thrive in the Upper Valley. 

We belong together.

There are lots of ways to be involved with our new community members as they settle into their lives among us. Here are just a few:

For the men: Help with rides to and from work (WRJ to Lebanon), when the Advance Transit buses aren’t active and the long bike ride is less feasible.

For the family: Child care shifts and play dates (Hanover area).

For all new neighbors: Social outings! Let’s transition from being “in service” to being friends. Help them explore and enjoy our quite special community. Think about inviting them to a meal at home (they’re good cooks and like to contribute) or at a local restaurant, a favorite walk or hike, a concert, yard games, sporting events, a trip to the beach … something you like to do and share.

If you’d like to join in and share some special time with these special people, or just learn more about the evolving adventure, please contact Martha Tecca, who’s helping with coordination. Email the Upper Valley Neighborhood Support Team or call 603-443-0283. To support the effort financially, you may contribute to the Welcome Fund. See donation details on this page.

Upper Valley Neighborhood Support Team

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The Upper Valley Neighborhood Support Team (UVNST) formed in October 2021, to share our local abundance with Afghan evacuees. This collaboration, in partnership with Ascentria Care Alliance in New Hampshire, began in Lyme and quickly, organically grew to involve individuals, organizations, and businesses across the Upper Valley. As a partner in this regional effort, CommunityCare of Lyme launched the Welcome Fund to accept donations and provide financial support for displaced individuals settling across the Upper Valley.

It’s been a full and life changing several months – for our new neighbors and many, many community members! Together, we have directly supported the resettlement of 18 Afghans and connected a Cuban family with local housing. We are now accompanying a small family and three individual men on their journeys to self-sufficiency and community involvement:

An advocate for women and children and her growing family

Behishta is a 27-year-old new Dartmouth masters student with a 5-year-old daughter starting Kindergarten and twins born in February. Her husband is in Turkey, unable to work in the US at this time. Dozens of volunteers provide rides, food, babysitting, clothing and other material needs, dental care, immigration guidance, driving lessons, and help to access community and state benefits. A car has been donated. A full scholarship for 9 weeks of summer camp was gifted to the family. Still, ongoing, substantial financial support is necessary to cover rent, formal child care, so many diapers, and other life necessities. Read her story.

Three former soldiers, with families still in Afghanistan

The men, aged 29-49, are Afghan soldiers who were embedded with the U.S. Army at the Pakistan border. They spoke no English on arrival. In beautiful collaboration with the leadership and teams at Hotel Coolidge and Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital, the men are working more than full time to pay their rent, food, and health insurance, while they send money home to their families struggling in Afghanistan. They speak with their wives, children and other family members every day. With substantial volunteer and organizational support, they are learning English, participating in the local Muslim community, preparing for their driving tests, continuing to work through immigration cases, and making real friends. Read their story.

These are real people, making real lives – and they need our help. Join us!